As a vital industrial and monetary metal, it has value around the world, regardless of economic conditions. It can be sold at current market prices as needed. As an investor in silver, buy it in basic forms such as bullion, bars, coins, and rounds to get the most silver for your dollar. Investors typically purchase it by weight, such the troy ounce, pound, gram or kilo. It is priced by its weight in .999 fine silver. If an item contains lower purity levels, it may fetch slightly lower prices per troy ounce of the .999 silver it contains.
Canadian Silver Maple Leaf: The official silver bullion of Canada, the Royal Canadian Mint set an impressive standard when it introduced the Silver Maple Leaf in 1988. Though it debuted after the American Eagle and Chinese Panda coins, it was the first and remains one of the few to use .9999 pure silver content. You’ll also find greater variety in the Silver Maple Leaf Series, with privy-mark coins available and unique series such as the Wild Canada collection.
Some people who invest in silver feel that silver bullion bars are a better investment than silver coins, because they cost less to purchase, and they are easy to store given their uniformity. If an investor wants physical wealth, silver bars are a good way to store a large amount in a relatively small space. Investors prefer the security of physically owning assets, because they’re far safer from inflation and market crashes than paper investments are.

Some people who invest in silver feel that silver bullion bars are a better investment than silver coins, because they cost less to purchase, and they are easy to store given their uniformity. If an investor wants physical wealth, silver bars are a good way to store a large amount in a relatively small space. Investors prefer the security of physically owning assets, because they’re far safer from inflation and market crashes than paper investments are.
Silver coins are our most popular and best-selling item collectively. Nearly every country has produced some type of silver coin in it's history. Previously used as common currency, today's silver coins are produced for investment purposes. Typically they are one troy ounce. Some of our most popular bullion silver coins are: American Silver Eagles, Canadian Silver Maple Leafs, Chinese Silver Pandas & Austrian Philharmonic. We also are highly competitive in the trading of US 90% Silver Coins or junk silver coins as it is commonly called.

Mainly a part of the discussion when we talk about any silver bullion instrument – premium over spot refers to how much more a product is worth (premium charged) over the melt value of silver present in the silver bullion coin, round, or bar. Just as a whole is more than the sum of its parts, the value of some bullion products is higher than their intrinsic worth, depending on the minting source, age, and rarity.


Canadian Silver Maple Leaf: The official silver bullion of Canada, the Royal Canadian Mint set an impressive standard when it introduced the Silver Maple Leaf in 1988. Though it debuted after the American Eagle and Chinese Panda coins, it was the first and remains one of the few to use .9999 pure silver content. You’ll also find greater variety in the Silver Maple Leaf Series, with privy-mark coins available and unique series such as the Wild Canada collection.
Silver bars come in probably the widest variety of sizes ranging from 1 gram to 1,000 ounces. With all of these options available, ten ounce bars and kilo bars are popular among investors, though you can also purchase smaller increments like 5 ounces and 1 ounce. One-thousand ounce bars exist, as well, though they’re generally too large for individuals.
One of the most common Canadian coins are the Canadian Maple Leaf Silver Coin. Each year, the Government of Canada issues the Canadian Maple Leaf coin. It is also legal tender, with a face value in Canada of about 5 Canadian dollars. The market value is determined based on the current spot price. The standard coin weighs 1 troy ounce and contains 99.99% silver. The obverse side of the Maple Leaf features Elizabeth II. The reverse has the Canadian maple leaf.
Historical precedent coupled with current fundamentals point to the likelihood of an explosive super spike in the silver price and a high price plateau beyond that. In the last super spike in 1979, the white metal went from $6 per ounce, to over $49 just 12 months later. In other words, that's an incredible 700% upsurge over the course of a single year! Today, industrial demand will continually increase along with its investment benefits. These factors will cause the price of silver per ounce to reach new highs, or possibly another huge spike similar to 1980. Let's look at additional factors why we're bullish on the poor man's gold:
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