Morgan dollars are one of the most collected coins in United States history. These large coins were produced between 1878 and 1904. They are part of America's westward development, which gives them historical significance. They were produced again in 1921. There are many varieties, making the Morgan a challenge for collectors. In 1921, the Silver Peace dollar was released and produced until 1935. While most Morgan dollars are worth little more than their actual melt value (despite what rare coin dealers attempt to argue) those that are in nearly pristine condition can be considered collectible and carry a premium well above the spot price. These coins represent peace, liberty and power in America.
Not all silver bars are sold for the same price. One reason the price may vary is by weight; a bar that weighs more will cost more because more metal is present. However prices may vary between bars of the same weight as well. This may be because of an intricate design, a proprietary technique used by the mint, the purity of the metal, or a number of other reasons. The price you are willing to pay can help dictate which bars you should focus on when considering a purchase.
Asahi Refining: This brand is new to many North American investors, but the facilities it owns are nothing new. Asahi Refining is based in Tokyo, Japan where it was founded in 1952. In December 2015, Asahi purchased the North American refining and assaying facilities of Johnson Matthey as the latter company exited the precious metals industry after more than 150 years. Asahi produces silver bullion bars in popular 1 oz, 10 oz, 1 Kilogram, and 100 oz weights with its corporate logo and assayer marks.

For those interested in investing in collectible items, silver coins are the primary choice. Silver coins contain the same amount of silver as in bars and rounds but since they come with a limited mintage, they have a higher premium. That high premium is also due to the fact that they are produced in a country's mint, instead of a private company. A lot of countries have their version of the silver dollar: the US has the silver eagle, the Royal Canadian Mint has the maple leaf, and People's Republic of China has the panda, to just name a few. Each country also produces one coin a year, making them appealing to those who enjoy collecting coins.

Spot price is a term that refers to the current price of a precious metal at any given time. Prices are in constant flux while international markets are open. Certain political and financial events or news can impact the prices of metals, so spot prices are very reactive to what is currently happening around the world. Keeping an eye on spot price trends helps you determine the best times to buy and sell your silver.
Monarch Silver Bars: Monarch Precious Metals is a private American refinery founded in 2008. The refinery sets itself apart with hand-poured, hand-stamped processes in the production of all its precious metal products. Those products are all a minimum .999 purity for both silver and gold. Examples of designs include hand-poured, stackable rounds with the Monarch Precious Metals “MPM” crown logo, the Viking Silver Bars with various images of Viking warriors on 5 oz silver bars, and even stackable “Lego” themed silver bars that playfully stack together for easy storage.

100 Gram 100×1 CombiBar: These 100 gram Valcambi silver CombiBars are of the 100×1 gram version, meaning you can break them into 100 individual pieces weighing 1 gram each. Each individual 1 gram bar features a 1 gram indication and the .999 purity as well as a Valcambi stamp. Being able to break these bars down means for greater versatility when selling or trading silver.
Bar sizes are typically one-ounce, 5 oz., 10 oz, and 100 oz. There are also large 1000 ounce bars. Smaller bars actually cost more per ounce because the fabrication costs are higher per ounce of metal. It is more cost effective for mints to produce larger bars, and as a result, they cost less per ounce. However, larger bars may be somewhat difficult to handle or store.
Silver rounds are not silver coins and tend to come with the lower premiums as silver bars. Silver rounds are, you guessed it, round and tend to resemble coins, whether it's the Buffalo Nickel design or the Walking Liberty. They mainly come in increments of 1oz, half ounce, quarter ounce, or tenth ounce. Some private mints have made larger rounds, such as 4oz, 6oz, 8oz, etc. Ordering silver rounds in bulk will allow you to receive the lowest price per ounce of silver. Silver Rounds fit into 1oz silver coin tubes perfectly, making them easy to store. Golden Eagle makes it easy to buy silver rounds using our online ordering system tied directly to the spot price of silver at the commodities exchange.
At Bullion Exchanges, we’re proud to offer you an extensive collection of silver coins so you can buy silver easily and unmatched by your local gold and silver shop. When you shop with Bullion Exchanges, you can rest assured that you will receive top-class customer service, speedy shipping, and the most competitive prices in the industry. We’re proud to have been serving the silver bullion community since 2012. If you’re just beginning to buy silver, you can find useful tips about the best way to buy silver bullion from our guide about investing in silver. So whether you’re a collector of silver coins, a casual fan of silver products, or an investor looking to broaden your portfolio, Bullion Exchanges is here to help you get the best products every time. 
For investors who want the best economic stability and utility, silver ingots may be a great choice. These smaller silver bars come in various ounces of high-quality silver. For the purest and most affordable silver ingot option, look for 99% fine silver without any commemorative labeling, as this can lower the value. Silver ingots are perfect for dividing, transporting, and utilizing as currency should the economy enter a crisis.
There is only one essential component that leads people to purchase silver bullion: Price. Silver spot prices move every day. The spot price of silver is driven by the going rate for the metal figured per troy ounce. Bullion Exchanges offers live feeds of the market, as well as, graphics of the historical evolution of silver prices, from a microscopic view of one hour, up to a year - providing our customers with precise information to make the best decision when buying silver bullion.

10 oz Fortuna Silver Bar: Engraved unto the reverse side of the bar is a column of text, which displays all of the bars important details. Serving as a header at the top of the bar is the PAMP Suisse mint mark, identifying it as a product of this renowned establishment. Directly below this emblem is the bar’s weight, purity and serial number for identification purposes. Lastly, printed at the bottom of this side is the phrase, “Essayeur Fonduer,” as evidence of the bar’s authenticity.
Bullion mints manufacture coins, rounds, and bars. The history of coins ties in closely with the history of mints. The first coins were hammered and production was slow and difficult. Now these sophisticated industrial facilities can produce hundreds of millions of coins, bars, and rounds. The minted silver coins are used for investment and currency purposes.
There are many reasons that investors (beginners and experts) immediately choose to buy silver more than any other precious metal. For beginners, when the price of silver per ounce is so much lower than gold, platinum, and palladium, they realize they can buy substantially more physical metal for their dollar. With its much lower price, buying silver bullion is much more appealing to small or novice investors.
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